Shawn Wildermuth

Stories

Tagged with ORM


Are ORMs Solving Anything?

Angry Baby

I like to write blog posts where I offer some pragmatic advice.  In most posts I try to include tons of code samples and example projects...but this post is different.  I am trying to get my head around something so I want to share what is in my head so I can get a conversation started with my readers to help me out.  Once you read this post, please comment...

The other day I was responding to a tweet from Doug Purdy. He had posted a link to some new EF 4.0 features by the boss at Microsoft's DevDiv. I, as usual, complained instead of lauded the list. I started a conversation about lazy loading and the potential danger of it, but quickly Doug mentioned that ORM's maybe were the wrong approach in general. That got me thinking (not always a good idea).

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The Fable of the Perfect ORM

Data is a funny business. While at the moment I am spending a lot of time teaching Silverlight, my passion still lives in the data. I was brought up on  Minisystems (Multi-user CP/M and the like) where you were dealing with something like a database (though we didn't have that as firm a concept as you might think). Later I did quite a lot of desktop database development starting with dBase II (yes, I am that old), Paradox, Clipper, FoxPro and even Access. That naturally led to client-server and N-Tier development. Throughout all the time its become exceptionally clear how much data matters to most applications.

But using databases can be difficult as there is an impedance mismatch with object-oriented development and the natural structure of data. The solution to this for many organizations has been to build data access and business object layers around the data.  These layers were meant to simplify data access for most developers and embed the business logic directly into a re-usable set of code instead of it ending up in the UI layer. This was a good thing...

But the problem is that much of the data access (and to a lesser extent, business object) code was very redundant. Developers ended up writing the same code or simply mimicking schema that was in the database. Some started to develop ways to use the database schema to their advantage to limit the amount of hand-written code was created. While not always called this, this is where object-relational mapping (ORM) products got their start. 

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Results of the Data Access Poll

If you havent voted, please feel free to vote for what data access strategy here:

http://wildermuth.com/2008/03/21/Data_Access_Strategies.aspx

For those who were interested in the results:

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Data Access Strategies

I had interesting conversations with a number of people about different data access/ORM strategies at MIX recently and was trying to understand where people are spending their efforts in consuming data. The conversation was essentially a discussion of who is using what to access data in .NET applications. I had assumed that certain solutions were widely used and others were not but I didn't have a good idea of what the market was really like. To help me with this I am asking you (my readers) to share with me where you are investing time in data access by taking the following poll:

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My New Article on NHibernate is Up!

Url: http://www.devsource.com/article2/0,1895,192569...

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OR Mappers, Code Generators and Business Object Frameworks

I am currently doing a bunch of evaluations on OR Mappers, Code Gen and Business Object Frameworks for my new book.  If anyone knows about anything great that might go unnoticed, please drop a comment or send me an email!

Thanks!

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DataSets vs. Custom Entities Again...

Url: http://www.devcow.com/weblogs/To+Use+DataSets+O...

I haven't had time to look at this new round of discussions about where DataSets fit into the data world.  I am still reformulating my ideas around DataSets after meeting with Microsoft and being told that they did not want to encourage use of DataSets in place of business objects. 

I have also been using CSLA.NET at a client and it has some good ideas about entity mapping in general, though it has a number of well documented downsides as well.  As Rocky would probably tell you, CSLA has it's place in some architectures but was not meant to fit into all solutions.

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Rocky and I Agree on n-Tier Development

Url: http://www.lhotka.net/WeBlog/PermaLink.aspx?gui...

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Rocky Lhotka on DataSets and Web Services and why I think he's wrong...

Url: http://www.lhotka.net/WeBlog/CommentView.aspx?g...

After reading Rocky's blog about DataSets and Web Services, I am afraid that he is falling into the same trap that other's have (including the emminently qualified Tim Ewald) with respect to DataSets.  DataSets work well in Web Services but not by default.  As I mentioned in:

http://wildermuth.com/content.aspx?id=rantview&rantid=7

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Data Part 2: n-Tier...Gone Tomorrow

Recently I was talking with Rocky Lhotka and he said something interesting:

Just when we got good at Client-Server, they switched things and had us doing n-Tier applications.  Just when we got good at n-Tier development, internet applications took off.

In my opinion he is right. It is interesting because client-server and n-Tier applications still exist, especially in enterprise development.  I think we're good at client-server and n-Tier.  The problem is that I think that much of browser based development attempts to apply n-Tier development. 

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Data Part 1: Business Objects, Messages and DataSets...

I've had time lately to think about the nature of data in development lately.  I've been talking with Rocky Lhotka and Michael Earls about it (as well as number of others) about the issues with dealing with data in applications. 

The first camp is all about writing Business Objects.  In this camp, you write classes that encapsulate the data, the data access and business rules about that data.  This camp was the way to do it for years now.  It proliferated in the Client-Server and n-Tier architecture camps. 

Rocky Lhotka espouses his excellent CSLA.NET framework.  If you are going the business object road, I wholeheartedly recommend it.  It is designed around allowing object to exist locally or on separate servers through remoting.

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Making Sense of Object-to-Relational Mappings

I've been following some threads on the DevelopMentor .NET Mailing Lists about what is a good solution for O/R Mapping.  I am intrigued by a couple of ideas, especially ones that no one seems to be talking about:

I have felt a little left out in the cold lately when it comes to O/R mapping.  I have spent the last two years on my soapbox about using DataSets (more specifically Typed DataSets) as the answer to Business Objects.  I have known I am odds with other data-centric authors/speakers out there, but I still think that Typed DataSets are a good solution now and in Whidbey.  But what about ObjectSpaces?

I like what ObjectSpaces is attempting to do.  I am suprised by the relative speed that it is able to achieve.  A lot of smart people have been working on it for a long long time and it shows.  The problem rears its head in a production environment (which no Whidbey code should be in as of now).  In my experience, creating the business object layer (O/R Mapping) was only 20% of the job.  Tuning it for performance always seems to rear its ugly head.  From my experience with ObjectSpaces so far, I am not satisfied that it will be all that tunable.

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