Shawn

Shawn Wildermuth

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Tagged with webassembly


The Reports of the Death of JavaScript are Greatly Exaggerated

Not John Bolton
Not John Bolton
The notorious quip by Mark Twain came to mind today as I was reviewing comments to my recent blog post about Blazor, a lot of the comments talked about WebAssembly being the death of JavaScript.

The fact is that we've all been here before. In fact, we've been here many times. And I, for one, don't want to simply see WebAssembly as something to replace JavaScript. Here are my thoughts.

So I've been in software development for over thirty years (I know, i'm old). And my experience with web development started about twenty years ago. So I've seen a lot of solutions to avoiding client-side development with Scripting Languages come and go. Here's a short list:

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Who is Blazor for Exactly?

https://webassembly.org/In case you haven't been following the news about WebAssembly (e.g. WASM), it's a new way to build something akin to bytecode for the browser. The latest versions of most browsers now support it including Chrome, Firefox and Edge.

Microsoft has built an experimental release of something called Blazor that builds web projects in WebAssembly so you can write all your code in C#. But after playing with one of the builds, I'm starting to think about who this really is for. Let's delve into what WebAssembly is and then how Blazor works to explain what I think.

There are a plethora of good descriptions of WebAssembly on the web, but I'll try and summarize it in practical terms. Essentially, it's a binary format for code in the browser. The expectation is that this code should run much faster than traditional JavaScript. This gives the browser several key benefits:

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