Stories Tagged with 'javascript'


My Practical PhoneGap Course is now Live!

If you're interested in cross-platform mobile apps, I like the solution that PhoneGap has. It uses HTML5/CSS/JS as the UI stack and I find it compelling to build apps for iOS, Android, Kindle, Windows Phone and Windows 8 Store. I've just released a new course on PhoneGap that attempts to fill in some of the holes in building apps.  The course includes:

Hope you enjoy the course. You can view it here:

PhoneGap and Windows 8

Traffic accident and to drivers fightingI've created a new example of a PhoneGap app for my talk at the Atlanta Windows Apps meeting. The talk I did tonight didn't go all that well, but I got it working and the result is something you can download and see how to use a minimum of WinJS to build your Windows 8 apps.

The example PhoneGap app sourcecode can be found on GitHub:

Building Cross-Platform Apps with HTML: Part 1 of 4

mobiledevices_clipOne of the things that I’ve been spending a lot of time working with lately is the ability to be able to build cross-platform apps. While I spend a lot of time in the Microsoft space (especially Windows 8 and Windows Phone 8), I need to be able to create and deploy apps to iOS and Android platforms. I've decided to do a series on building one of these using Single Page Application for the web, then deploying it to devices via PhoneGap:

There are a number of solutions for cross platform apps (e.g. MonoTouch/Droid, et al.)  The types of apps I am building are just consuming or displaying information from a standard web back-end (e.g. REST services).  Because I typically need to build a responsive website for the solution as well, using a solution that could share some or all of it’s code with the website is a good match.

Clarifying Windows Phone 8 HTML5 Apps

If you made it to build or spent much time watching the videos one of the stories many heard from Microsoft revolved about creating HTML5/JS applications for the Windows Phone 8. Unfortunately the story confused a lot of people (at least by the questions I've been getting lately.

Let me be clear...you *can* create HTML5/JS/CSS applications for Windows Phone 8. Yup. In fact, you could do it with Windows Phone 7 and 7.5. This is how PhoneGap works. The XAML page simply hosts a WebBrowser control and loads all of the assets locally in the XAP. What you can't do is create WinJS application. Let's step back a little and explain that better.

ReMIX South 2012

_0012_Logo-Yellow-onWhiteI had a great time at ReMIX South this year! It's been great to meet developers and designers and learn how they are using design tools of all sorts.

If you attended my "Modern Web Development" workshop, here is where you can get the slides and code. If you have questions about the workshop, please just add a comment and i'll respond as soon as I can:

JavaScript for C# Developers Live!

If you're in the Atlanta, I am holding a one-day JavaScript for the C# Developer course. The course will cover:

This is the perfect course for existing .NET developers who are trying to get up to speed with JavaScript for web development or Windows 8 App development. The course will take place on November 14th and costs $299.99. You can register for the event here:

TypeScript (or the obligatory post about it)

Like many of you, I've been itching to see what Anders had up his sleeve and I wasn't disappointed yesterday when they announced TypeScript. After teaching all day, I took a quick look at TypeScript (and I do mean quick).

There was a lot of buzz yesterday and the response seemed to be in one of two camps (for the most part):

When to Not Use Observable in KnockoutJS

javascriptI've been really busy lately and my list of things to blog on has been getting backed up. One thing that occurred to me while building my new JavaScript course was about how KnockoutJS and Observables actually work. Here's the deal.

KnockoutJS supports the idea of an observable object. This is similar to WPF/XAML concept of INotifyPropertyChanged interface. Most KnockoutJS dev's I've talked with use KnockoutJS's observable everywhere. But there are cases when you don't need it.

My New Course: JavaScript for C# Devs

If you are a C# developer who is ready to take on JavaScript, I have the course for you. The goal of the new course is to help C# developers understand the nature of JavaScript so you can write JavaScript like a native speaker. This is for developers who need JavaScript for any of the popular places to use JavaScript including:

The course aims to map C# features directly to JavaScript features so you can understand many key topics including:

aspConf was fun!

I had a good time doing a couple of talks today. If you joined me online, thanks for coming. For those who missed my talks, they will be posting the videos on Channel 9. As promised you can get the slides and examples here for my talks:

I hope you enjoyed the talks!

New Pluralsight Course on Debugging Web Sites

After a long gestation, I finally completed my Web Debugging course for Pluralsight. This new course covers the details of using the tools in the browsers to debug layout, JavaScript, CSS and networking. While the course shows you how to find the tools in all the major browsers, the focus is using Firefox and Firebug. Though the techniques shown in Firebug apply pretty seamlessly to all the browser tools. This course is not .NET specific, but should be useful to any web developers.

The course is broken up into four sections:

JavaScript for the C# Guy: The confusion about 'this'

As a C# guy I am comfortable with the idea of 'this' in the scope of a class (or 'Me' for your VB'ers). It's a relatively simple idea that allows you to access the instance of the class that you're a part of to call members.

In JavaScript that have a similar idea but because of the nature of JavaScript it can cause some odd behavior. Let's look at the standard behavior first.

JavaScript for the C# Guy: The Global Object

codeThis is another in my series about (hopefully) interesting JavaScript constructs that might surprise most C# developers. You can see others here: JavaScript for the C# Guy.

Back in the day I was doing some scripting in classic ASP sites (no, not classic ASP.NET) and we screamed and yelled about putting too much in the global scope. We wanted encapsulation and such and that is true today. In my C# work pretty much everything is in a class (static or otherwise) so I don't have to concern myself with it much.  But in JavaScript I know there is an easily accessible global object...but it occurred to me that I don't see the "Global" object accessed much; even though it is used a bit (to hold other containers that have encapsulated code). "Why not?" I wondered.

Modern Web Development - Part 8

shawnsouthparkThis is the eighth of ten parts of this blog post. The topics will be:

Oh Facebook…how do you becoming so insistent on integrating you into every website? Well anyway, let’s show you how it actually works. In this post, I’ll show you how to authenticate an app using Facebook.

When you want to integrate with Facebook, you’ll need the Facebook SDK. Unlike other JavaScript APIs, the Facebook API isn’t a download. The API has some specific peculiar patterns that it requires. But if you obey Facebook, it will (usually) bend to your will. To get started you’ll want to visit the Facebook developer site:

JavaScript for the C# Guy: Scopes

roach

Another day in JavaScript land for this  C# guy. I am reading the excellent Professional JavaScript for Web Developers and I am finding more and more that separates the two languages. I know everyone will mention it, but I did read JavaScript: The Good Parts and I liked it but it isn’t as comprehensive as this book.

From my Web Dev for XAML Devs Talk

SpaghettiBabyI had the opportunity tonight to do a talk for the Atlanta XAML Meetup on Web Development for XAML Developers. I had fun explaining how XAML developers can use their existing skills with markup, design, data binding and data access on web page development. You can see the slides from the talk here:

JavaScript for the C# Guy: Function Overloads

dreamstime_1087355089A3Ib17I’ve been writing a lot of JavaScript lately. As a C# guy, I noticed that try and take my knowledge from my time in C# (and C++ and even a little Java) and try to apply it. They are curly braces after all…but alas it doesn’t always work. I’ll learn my lesson one day ;) (though I doubt it).

Lesson for today? Function overloads. Coming from that world I wrote simple code like this:

Modern Web Development - Part 6

mortarpestleThis is the sixth of ten parts of this blog post. The topics will be:

The Problem

Modern Web Development - Part 5

This is the fifth of ten parts of this blog post. The topics will be:

jQuery Plugins

Modern Web Development - Part 4

This is the fourth of ten parts of this blog post. The topics will be:

Debugging

The Web Workshop: Client-Side Dev Training

I am excited to announce that I’ve refactored (and renamed) my web-centric training course. The old “ASP.NET MVC/HTML/CSS Workshop” was just too long. It’s now called “The Web Workshop”.

Modern Web Development - Part 2

SpaghettiThis is the second of ten parts. The topics will be:

Working with JavaScript can be daunting. In the past, I’ve seen some projects with just a handful of huge files that become difficult to manage. So in architecting what I needed to build, I wanted to adhere to the idea that there was common code and there was view-specific code. There are two different classes of JavaScript that I care about: libraries (i.e. not my code) and site code (i.e. my code).

Modern Web Development - Part 1

This is the first of ten parts of this blog post. The topics will be:

In the past year I’ve had a side project. FirstInked’s Beta recently shipped and I wanted to share with you what I’ve learned. To start out, I want to specifically thank two people who were really great in helping me formulate the strategies I’ll talk about. They are:

The Case of the ModelBinding Failure

I wasted an evening last night on a simple bug of mine. I was writing a simple HTML data entry page. I was using JSON + $.ajax to POST data to a ASP.NET MVC controller and it used to work. But for the life of me I couldn’t figure out what was wrong. Let’s start with some background.

Using MVVM on the Web with KnockoutJS

As most of you know, I have been in the Silverlight space for quite a while. (And to be clear to the chicken-little amongst you, no I am not leaving the Silverlight community.) I’ve been building a web application for consumers so that HTML + JavaScript represents the right solution to building a project like we’re building (more on what I am building in the near future). 

One of the things I wanted to be able to do is to build longer-lived pages where it made sense without having to resort to post-backs or hacked together JavaScript. In fact, what I really wanted was a client-side ViewModel (e.g. MVVM) for my web page. After looking at several of the existing frameworks for the job, I settled on KnockoutJS as a great solution. The currently released version (1.21) is a good solution, but the developers of the framework have released a Beta (1.3Beta) version that greatly simplifies what I needed. If you want to follow along, make sure you download that version here.

Shawn
Shawn Wildermuth
Author, Teacher, and Coach




My Courses

Wilder Minds Training
Vue.js by Example (Now Available)
Bootstrap 4 by Example
Intro to Font Awesome 5 (Free Course)
Pluralsight
Less: Getting Started (Coupon Available)
Building a Web App with ASP.NET Core, MVC6, EF Core, Bootstrap and Angular (updated for 2.1)
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