Shawn Wildermuth


My Rants and Raves about technology, programming, everything else...

Converting an ASP.NET Core RC1 Project to RC2

datascreenWith the release of ASP.NET Core RC2, Microsoft hit a major milestone. But this change isn’t a trivial one. It’s a big change.

Since I’m updating my Pluralsight course on ASP.NET Core, I wanted to get a list of changes for the new version. I figured I’d share all the changes I could find converting a stock RC1 project to a RC2 one. It’s a big list, but hopefully manageable. Please share in comments and changes I missed so others can be helped!

Getting Ready for ASP.NET Core RC2

I’m starting to play with the Preview of RC2 (nightly builds). It’s not time to do it for most people, but I’m trying to prepare for the update to my ASP.NET Core RC1 course on Pluralsight.

I have a couple of small library projects that I created when I build the new website. Since they are both pretty small and have xUnit testing, I thought it might be a good place to start.

The Future of project.json in ASP.NET Core

aholebabyIf you’re not paying attention to Twitter, the ASP.NET Standup or the Github repositories, you might be missing a big change coming to ASP.NET Core. Now is time to add your opinion so that Microsoft can make the right move.

I suggest you read up on the change and make your voice heard if you have an opinion. My opinion is pretty clearly stated in the GitHub discussion so I won’t bother to repeat it here, but I’m asking you to get involved.

Writing API Controllers in ASP.NET MVC 6

Audio and video plugs in handBefore ASP.NET Core, our world was split between ASP.NET MVC and ASP.NET Web API. In ASP.NET Core that changes to a single model in ASP.NET MVC 6 for handling requests, whether they end up returning data or views.

There is a Web API Shim to bring over old controllers for use in ASP.NET Core. But for new projects (e.g. greenfield), I’d suggest writing your API controllers without the shim.

On the Road Again...

The Hello World Road Trip part two has started. Me and the missus headed out of Atlanta to Belgium for our first stop.

We arrived at Techorama, I did a couple of talks and recorded our Belgium podcast with the great Bill Wagner. That should be up this weekend.

Deploying ASP.NET Core RC1 to Azure App Services

cloudraysAs you can see, I recently updated this blog. I wrote the new blog using ASP.NET Core RC1 (as related technologies) so when time came to deploy it, I had some issues.

At the time I thought it was Azure, but after testing with an empty project that worked, I figured it was probably something I did. In this post, I’ll talk about what I did to get it to work in Azure Websites.

Implementing an ASP.NET Core RC1 Logging Provider

LumberI recently added a logging provider to my open source project (WilderBlog). I know I shouldn’t have implemented a provider myself, but I wanted to see how the sausage was made.

The reality is that I should have used an existing library like Serilog or others, but digging into the logging framework taught be how the system works. I’m hoping to show you what I learned.

Using Cache in ASP.NET Core 1.0 RC1

When I created my blog in ASP.NET Core, I forgot about one feature that I used to help out some other Pluralsight authors by creating a quick top 100 list of courses. Because Pluralsight doesn’t really expose that data as an API, I didn’t want to hammer their service, so I had been using a memory cache to do it.

But when I moved the code over, I realized that the old, reliable Cache object was missing. Luckily I found it and like much of ASP.NET Core, adding it was simple and consistent. Let me show you.

Welcome to the New Wildermuth.com

javascriptA while back, I decided that this blog deserved a clean coat of paint and since I’m digging into ASP.NET Core, it was logical to re-write it. I wanted more than just to change the look, I wanted to make some real changes to the code and finally open source the code too!

Open sourcing the code required that I do a few things. First of all, I had to change any code that I would be embarrassed by (not a trivial task), but also make it so that much of normal secrets weren’t exposed by open sourcing it (e.g. connection strings, etc.). But as of now, I’ve done it. The source is available and the site is live! I am sure that there are issues with the site, but hopefully I’ll iron those out as they crop up.

Docker and ASP.NET Core: A Webcast

I’m at it again. I’m enjoying playing with the ASP.NET Core bits so much that I have to share what I’m learning.

This time it’ll be using ASP.NET Core in a Docker container. In this shortish webcast, I’ll show you an existing project that uses ASP.NET Core to build a blog project (my open source WilderBlog example) and deploy it to a Docker container locally using the Docker tooling. I’ll also mention cloud providers too including using AWS, Azure and Google Cloud.

Content Negotiation in ASP.NET Core

aspcore-1024x355As you might know, in ASP.NET Core, the MVC6 stack now includes the Web API functionality. Having a single stack has advantages and I’m happy they’ve converged the two stacks.

While working with early builds, I noticed the patterns for doing content negotiation weren’t working as expected so I defaulted to the MVC approach to REST APIs. In the RC1 build, it seems to be working as expected. Let’s talk about it.

Hello World Road Trip - So Far

We’re in San Francisco today and I thought it would be a good time to write a quick update to the trip. As some of you know, we’re currently in the middle of a twenty-five city trip and so far so good.

Tomorrow night we do the event here in San Francisco (with the amazing Beth Massi as our guest) and I’m excited to do our sixth event. It’s been an amazing couple of weeks and we can’t wait for the rest of the trip to unfold.

Atlanta Stop of the Hello World Road Trip

Had a great time kicking off the road trip in Atlanta. If you missed it, you’ll be able to hear Jim Wooley’s story soon on the Hello World Podcast!

In case you don’t know, at each stop of the http://hwroadtrip.com I’m doing a live recorded podcast as well as an hour talk about ASP.NET Core 1.0. We’re feeding everyone and giving away some great prizes by our sponsors including Pluralsight and Infragistics!

Angular 2 and ASP.NET Core - A Webcast

imageI’ve been toying around with getting Angular 2 working in a simple ASP.NET Core app. There are some specific caveats with getting it to work in Microsoft’s new framework. Let me show you how.

Now Angular 2 is in early beta and ASP.NET Core is in RC1 so I am taking a risk. I’m going to have a live webcast and I’ll build an Angular 2 app in an ASP.NET Core application. Come watch me walk the tightrope. No promises.

Kicking Off The Road Trip!

It’s almost time to hit the road again and I am very excited! I’m headed across North America (with a dash of Europe) over twenty-five cities this spring.

During each stop of the road trip, I’m recording an episode of the Hello World Podcast, then doing an hour talk about ASP.NET 5 ASP.NET 1.0 Core!

ASP.NET 5 Webinar

I had a great time today talking about ASP.NET 5 on a Pluralsight webinar. Over 1,000 people were able to attend. Thank you all for tuning in!

The webinar showed the very basics of what ASP.NET 5 is and why it exists. I had fun answering all the questions and wish we had time to answer more.

Upgrading ASP.NET 5 Beta 8 to RC1

UPDATED: Missed fixes.

It’s that time again. ASP.NET 5 has a new release and this one has a go-live license! As announced today, the RC1 is available and a new RC2 is coming in the future.

ASP.NET 5 and Bower

ps_logoAs most of you already know, I have a new course on ASP.NET 5. I’ve just released a teaser video that shows how the Bower.json editor in Visual Studio works.

The course was recently updated to use the ASP.NET Beta 8 bits. I am looking forward to the next update of ASP.NET and expect to continue to update the course all the way through the RTM.

The Week at DEVIntersection

PrintI want to thank all the great attendees I met at this week’s DEVIntersection (Fall 2015) conference in Vegas! Richard Campbell and company put on a great show!

I had the opportunity to do three talks and two of them went well (if you were at my Bootstrap talk, you know what I’m talking about). In any case, I wanted to share the slide and code with the attendees so here it is:

Upgrading from ASP.NET 5 Beta 7 to Beta 8

officetoolsIf you’ve been following along, you know by now that I’m investing my time into learning ASP.NET 5. Now that the ASP.NET team have released a new version, let me help you move your code to the new version.

The update this time includes some simple package changes but also some major API changes. I am sure I can’t cover them all here, but hopefully I’ll help you avoid the major ones.

New Course on ASP.NET 5!

aspnetIf you read my blog, you probably already know how excited I am about ASP.NET 5. To dovetail with that, I’ve created a nine-hour course on Pluralsight that covers this brand-new technology from Redmond.

This new course is similar to my end-to-end course on ASP.NET 4/MVC5 that I released a couple of years ago. The goal of the course is to teach you all the concepts while helping you build a simple web app.

A Look at ASP.NET 5: Part 5 - The API

hddcable

The more I work with ASP.NET 5, the more it looks and feels like the old ASP.NET stack except for the hosting. That’s a good thing in most cases, but writing the API that changes.

A Look at ASP.NET 5: Part 4 - MVC 6

measurewoodI had planned on finishing these a long time ago, but working on my Pluralsight course about ASP.NET 5 distracted me. Sorry about that.

If you’ve been doing web development in .NET, you probably have at least a passing experience with ASP.NET’s MVC framework. At it’s core, it’s a common way to build and architect web applications. The new stack is built on the same metaphors from the older versions. If you’ve been using MVC before, you won’t be lost and some of the additions are welcome.

ASP.NET 5 Identity and REST APIs

deadboltAs I’ve been digging into building apps with ASP.NET 5, I’ve had to get used to some of the new metaphors. Some of these make sense (especially if you’ve used Node before), but some are brand new to me. One of these metaphors I ran into was the idea of Identity notifications. 

The problem I was running into was one I thought many people would run into: using Identity (e.g. authentication/authorization) with REST APIs. Here is the scenario:

Angular v. React v. Aurelia v. et al.

babyflyerWhen I announced my upcoming course, I had a lot of people ask me about what I thought of X framework versus Angular (which I’m covering in the course). I feel like I have to say something.

Before I bestow my blessing, let’s talk about the fundamental problem of frameworks in general. They can be a boon or a bust and many developers have been hurt by a selection of a specific framework in the past. I know I’m being asked so that some devs can go to their architect to confirm their particular positions. I’m hoping to avoid that in this post, but I doubt it will work.


Application Name WilderBlog Environment Name Production
Application Ver 1.1.0.0 Runtime Framework .NETCoreApp,Version=v1.1
App Path D:\home\site\wwwroot Runtime Version .NET Core 4.6.25211.01
Operating System Microsoft Windows 6.2.9200 Runtime Arch X86